Tag Archives: children’s literature

Revealed! Book Club Choices for August. Happy Reading.

Yes, I said I was on vacation this week, but I forgot that it was time for the book club suggestions. So here I am, live from Kansas City, for a single post.

Because nothing boosts happiness more than a great book, each month, I suggest:

· one outstanding book about happiness or habits

· one outstanding work of children’s or young-adult literature–I have a crazy passion for kidlit

· one eccentric pick–a widely admired and excellent book that I love, yes, but one that may not appeal to everyone

I’ll post these recommendations here, or to make sure you don’t miss them, sign up for the monthly Book Club newsletter.

Shop at the wonderful Brooklyn indie WORD, BN.com, Amazon (I’m an affiliate of all three), or your favorite local bookstore. Or visit the library! Drumroll…

An outstanding book about happiness or habits:

Nudge: Improving Decisions about Health, Wealth, and Happiness by Richard Thaler and Cass Sunstein

Buy from WORD; BN.com; Amazon.

An outstanding children’s book:

The Westing Game by Ellen Raskin

Buy from WORD; BN.com; Amazon.

An eccentric pick:

Traffic: Why We Drive the Way We Do (and What It Says About Us) by Tom Vanderbilt

Buy from WORD; BN.com; Amazon.

Some readers have said that they wished that I’d describe and make the case for my book choices, instead of just providing links. I’m considering whether to change this, but I haven’t so far, for two reasons:

I’ve noticed that many times, when someone describes a book to me, I want to read it less. And often, weirdly, the better a book is, the worse it sounds. I assure you: when I choose these books, I love them; I’ve read them at least twice if not many times; and they’re widely admired.

Also, one of the secrets of reading lots of books is making time to read. It would take me a lot of time and mental energy to do justice to the terrific books I choose, yet at the same time, with a single click, there’s a huge amount of information available about the book choices. So I’ve figured that I could let readers avail themselves of that option.  But I’m pondering whether I should do it differently. (By the way, here are more tips on getting more reading done.)

In the meantime, if you want a little more explanation of why I picked these books, I do provide slightly more context in the book club newsletter.

If you read last month’s recommendations…what did you think? Crossing to Safety; Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH; and Fight Club. All so good.

Revealed! Book Club Choices for July. Happy Reading.

Because nothing boosts happiness more than a great book, each month, I suggest:

· one outstanding book about happiness or habits

· one outstanding work of children’s or young-adult literature–I have a crazy passion for kidlit

· one eccentric pick–a widely admired and excellent book that I love, yes, but one that may not appeal to everyone

I’ll post these recommendations here, or to make sure you don’t miss them, sign up for the monthly Book Club newsletter.

Shop at the wonderful Brooklyn indie WORD, BN.com, Amazon (I’m an affiliate of all three), or your favorite local bookstore. Or visit the library! Drumroll…

An outstanding book about happiness or habits:

Crossing to Safety by Wallace Stegner

Buy from WORD; BN.com; Amazon.

An outstanding children’s book:

Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH by Robert O’Brien

Buy from WORD; BN.com; Amazon.

An eccentric pick:

Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk

Buy from WORD; BN.com; Amazon.

I’ve noticed that many times, when someone describes a book to me, I want to read it less. And often, weirdly, the better a book is, the worse it sounds. So I won’t describe these books, but I love all the books I recommend; I’ve read them at least twice if not many times; and they’re widely loved. If you want a little more explanation of why I picked these books, I do provide slightly more context in the book club newsletter.

If you read last month’s recommendations…what did you think? Daily Rituals; Jane-Emily; and The Design of Everyday Things. All so good.

If you’re reading this post through the daily email, click here to join the conversation. And if you’d like to get the daily blog post by email, sign up here. You can ignore that RSS business.

Revealed! Book Club Choices for April. Happy Reading.

Because nothing boosts happiness more than a great book, each month, I suggest:

· one outstanding book about happiness or habits

· one outstanding work of children’s or young-adult literature–I have a crazy passion for kidlit

· one eccentric pick–a widely admired and excellent book that I love, yes, but one that may not appeal to everyone

I’ll post these recommendations here, or to make sure you don’t miss them, sign up for the monthly Book Club newsletter.

Shop at the wonderful Brooklyn indie WORD, BN.com, Amazon (I’m an affiliate of all three), or your favorite local bookstore. Or visit the library! Drumroll…

An outstanding book about happiness or, more specifically, habits:

Laurie Colwin, Family Happiness. This excellent novel is is a brilliant portrait of an Obliger in full Obliger-rebellion, if that interests you.

Buy from WORD; BN.comAmazon.

An outstanding young-adult book:

Norton Juster, The Phantom Tollbooth. This is an outstanding book, which I planned to recommend next month; for this month, I intended to recommend Carol Ryrie Brink’s Andy Buckram’s Tin Men. And it’s out of print! Horrible. Try to get it from the library, so good.

Buy from WORD; BN.com; Amazon.

An eccentric pick:

Journal of Eugene Delacroix.

Buy from WORD; BN.com; Amazon.

I’ve noticed that many times, when someone describes a book to me, I want to read it less. And often, weirdly, the better a book is, the worse it sounds. So I won’t describe these books, but I love all the books I recommend; I’ve read them at least twice if not many times; and they’re widely loved. I do provide slightly more context in the book club newsletter.

If you read last month’s recommendations…what did you think? Charles Duhigg’s The Power of Habit;William Pene du Bois’s The Twenty-One Balloons; and Anne Lamott’s Operating Instructions.

If you’re reading this post through the daily email, click here to join the conversation. And if you’d like to get the daily blog post by email, sign up here. (You can ignore that RSS business.)

Revealed! Book Club Choices for March. Happy Reading.

Because nothing boosts happiness more than a great book, each month, I suggest:

· one outstanding book about happiness or habits

· one outstanding work of children’s or young-adult literature–I have a crazy passion for kidlit

· one eccentric pick–a widely admired and excellent book that I love, yes, but one that may not appeal to everyone

I’ll post these recommendations here, or to make sure you don’t miss them, sign up for the monthly Book Club newsletter.

Shop at the wonderful Brooklyn indie WORD, BN.com, Amazon (I’m an affiliate of all three), or your favorite local bookstore. Or visit the library! Drumroll…

An outstanding book about happiness or, more specifically, habits:

Charles Duhigg, The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business

Buy from WORD; BN.comAmazon.

An outstanding young-adult book:

William Pene du Bois,  The Twenty-One Balloons

Buy from WORD; BN.com; Amazon.

An eccentric pick:

Anne Lamott, Operating  Instructions: A Journal of My Son’s First Year

Buy from WORD; BN.com; Amazon.

I’ve noticed that many times, when someone describes a book to me, I want to read it less. And often, weirdly, the better a book is, the worse it sounds. So I won’t describe these books, but I love all the books I recommend; I’ve read them at least twice if not many times; and they’re widely loved. I do provide slightly more context in the book club newsletter.

If you read last month’s recommendations…what did you think? Roenneberg’s Internal Time, Hunt’s Up a Road Slowly, and Tartt’s The Secret

If you’re reading this post through the daily email, click here to join the conversation. And if you’d like to get the daily blog post by email, sign up here. (You can ignore that RSS business.)

“Those Who Find Comfort in Literature…in Personal Adornment, and…in Food.”

“Maria gazed at her boots. Miss Heliotrope restored her spectacles to their proper position, [and] picked up the worn brown volume of French essays…

“Humanity can be roughly divided into three sorts of people–those who find comfort in literature, those who find comfort in personal adornment, and those who find comfort in food.”

–Elizabeth Goudge, The Little White Horse

This is a very broad statement, but as I thought about it, it struck me that there’s a fair amount of truth in it. Agree, disagree?

This book was written in 1946. To update it a bit, maybe I’d change “literature” to…what word encompasses literature, and also TV, movies, the internet?

Any other major sources of comfort that you’d include along with literature, personal adornment, and food? Perhaps animals?

If you’re reading this post through the daily email, click here to join the conversation. And if you’d like to get the daily blog post by email, sign up here.